PMI-ACP®: Agile Methodologies (2 of 11)

This course will provide an in-depth understanding of Agile methodologies. This course is part of the PMI-ACP® Agile Project Management series.
Course info
Rating
(27)
Level
Intermediate
Updated
Aug 1, 2016
Duration
3h 54m
Table of contents
Description
Course info
Rating
(27)
Level
Intermediate
Updated
Aug 1, 2016
Duration
3h 54m
Description

This course will provide an in-depth understanding of Agile methodologies with particular emphasis on a detailed discussion of Scrum, Scrum Principles and Values, and Kanban. The course also includes a general comparison of Agile and traditional, plan-driven methodologies, a comparison of Agile and PMBOK, and an overview of other Agile methodologies that are not as widely-used as Scrum. This course is part of the PMI-ACP® Agile Project Management series.

About the author
About the author

Chuck Cobb is the author of the recent best-selling book, “The Project Manager’s Guide to Mastering Agile" plus four other books and numerous professional articles. He is an expert-level Agile Project Manager with over 20 years of real-world project and program management experience and is passionate about helping project managers understand the convergence of Agile and traditional project management principles and practices.

More from the author
More courses by Chuck Cobb
Section Introduction Transcripts
Section Introduction Transcripts

Lean Software Development
Hi, and welcome to this module in the PMI-ACP Learning Path. This course is focused on Agile methodologies, and this module is on Lean Software Development. Here's a brief summary of the topics in this module. We're going to start with a brief overview of the Lean Software Development methodology, then we're going to talk about the general principles behind Lean Software development, and finally we're going to discuss the idea of value stream analysis, which is very closely related to Lean Software Development. Lean Software Development is based on applying the principles originally developed in Lean manufacturing to software development. The primary emphasis in Lean manufacturing is on reducing waste in a manufacturing process to ultimately improve the efficiency of the process, and to reduce production costs. The concept of Lean Software Development originated from a popular book by Tom and Mary Poppendieck in which they showed how to apply the original Lean manufacturing principles that we have previously discussed to software development. Lean Software Development is similar to Kanban in a number respects. It's not widely used as a standalone development methodology, but none the less, the principles behind Lean are applicable to any Agile methodology including Scrum. Some people might see Lean and Agile as contradictory to each other. Lean tends to emphasize standardizing and streamlining processes to improve efficiency, while Agile emphasizes flexibility and adaptivity to meet customer needs in a very uncertain environment. If each of those goals were pursued in isolation and to an extreme, they might in fact be somewhat in opposition to each other; however, if they are treated correctly and blended together in the right proportions, they can actually be very complimentary to each other.