AWS Networking Deep Dive: Route 53 DNS

AWS is one of the most popular public cloud providers. This course will teach you how to configure Route 53 for any domain name, configure health checks, and set up routing policies.
Course info
Rating
(18)
Level
Intermediate
Updated
May 18, 2018
Duration
4h 10m
Table of contents
Course Overview
Course Introduction
Lab Setup
Creating Public Hosted Zones and Simple Records
Configuring Health Checks and Failover Records
Distributing Traffic with Weighted Records
Geolocation and Latency Records
Creating Traffic Flow Policies
Load Balancing with Multivalue Answer Records
Creating Private Hosted Zones for Amazon VPCs
Transferring Existing Domain Names to Route 53
Description
Course info
Rating
(18)
Level
Intermediate
Updated
May 18, 2018
Duration
4h 10m
Description

Understanding and configuring DNS can be tough. In this course, AWS Networking Deep Dive: Route 53 DNS, you'll learn how to configure Route 53 to work with any domain name, even if it's registered with a different registrar. First, you'll learn DNS concepts and how Route 53 fits in with the internet's domain name system. Next, you'll see how to create public hosted zones, health checks, and routing policies. Finally, you'll explore how to use private hosted zones with your AWS VPCs. When you're finished with this course, you'll have the necessary skills and knowledge to use Route 53 with any domain name.

About the author
About the author

Ben Piper is an IT consultant and the author of "Learn Cisco Network Administration in a Month of Lunches" from Manning Publications. He holds numerous certifications from Cisco, Citrix, and Microsoft.

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Section Introduction Transcripts
Section Introduction Transcripts

Course Overview
Hi everyone, my name is Ben Piper, and welcome to my course AWS Networking Deep Dive: Route 53 DNS. I'm an AWS certified solutions architect and author. DNS, the domain name system, is the glue that holds the internet together. Amazon's Route 53 DNS service not only integrates seamlessly with other AWS offerings, but it also provides many powerful features that go above and beyond what you'll find with most DNS providers. In this course, you'll learn how to use Route 53 with any domain name, even if it's already registered with a different provider. You'll learn how to control traffic to your resources using DNS based routing policies that consider things such as resource health, network latency, geographic location, and more. Some of the major topics that we'll cover include, but certainly are not limited to, using an existing domain name with Route 53, registering a new domain name, health checks and failover routing policies, DNS-based load-balancing and geolocation, and private hosted zones for use with Amazon VPCs. By the end of this course, you'll known how to configure Route 53 for any situation and how to use it with any domain name. Before beginning the course, you should be familiar with creating VPCs and managing AWS instances. I hope you'll join me on this journey to learn DNS with the AWS Networking Deep Dive: Route 53 DNS course, only at Pluralsight.

Creating Public Hosted Zones and Simple Records
Welcome back. In this module you're going to learn how to configure Route 53 to host DNS services for your domain name. Now recall from earlier, I said that you need to decide whether you want to use an existing domain name, which you've already registered, or if you want to register a new domain name using Route 53. Regardless of which of these options you've chosen, please watch this module from beginning to end because I'm going to cover both. Here's the high level overview of what you'll learn in this module. First, you'll learn how the domain registration process works, and specifically how a registry operator knows which name servers are authoritative for a domain. Next, you'll learn how to use an existing domain name with Route 53, and finally, you'll learn how to register a new domain name with Route 53. This all sounds pretty simple and straightforward, but as you're going to see, there are a lot of details lurking beneath the surface, and, hint, a lot we have to cover. So let's get started.

Geolocation and Latency Records
Welcome back DNS lovers. In this module, we're going to cover two different, but related, resource record types, geolocation records and latency records. Before we jump in, I want to stress that the global nature of the internet's domain name system makes every Route 53 configuration very unique. That does present a bit of challenge when you're following along with the labs because you're not using the same domain name I am, and you're not in the same location I am. So some of the labs that I show in this course will necessarily differ, in some cases quite drastically, from what you might experience. This is especially true when dealing with geolocation and latency records. Now it's time for a geography lesson. To illustrate how these record types work, I'm going to use the United States because, yes, that's where I live, but also because US locations in Route 53 are treated a bit differently than other countries, as we'll see in a moment. The United States is, of course, divided up into 50 states, all shown on this map. There are three of these states that I want to draw your attention to. Over on the left, or west side of the map, that big orange state is California, which is where the us-west-1 AWS region is. Over on the right, the east side of the map, the orange state is Virginia. That's where the us-east-1 region is. Two states south of that, you've got the state of South Carolina, which is where I am. Throughout the module I'm going to refer to South Carolina by its state abbreviate, SC. Okay, that's your geography lesson. Now it's time for a lesson on geolocation records.

Creating Traffic Flow Policies
In this module, you're going to learn how to create traffic flow policies. This is going to be a short module because the process for this is easy. In fact, if you were to use just one word to describe traffic flow policies, that would be it, easy. There are two components to the traffic flow architecture. First, there's the traffic flow visual editor. This is a drag and drop GUI that lets you create and chain together resource records by linking them together in a graph, rather than having to do it by hand. The traffic flow visual editor generates a traffic policy, which is just a text document in JavaScript Object Notation, or JSON, format. You can then install this policy in your zone as a policy record. This sounds really easy, why didn't we just use this to start with? Well it comes at a price, $50 US per policy record per month. Yikes. Now my experience has been that when I've created a policy record in a zone and deleted it within a few hours, I have not been charged. However, please don't assume that you will get the same treatment. AWS does not claim that you won't be charged and neither do I.

Load Balancing with Multivalue Answer Records
Hello again and welcome back. In this module, you're going to explore multivalue answer records. Every resource record we've created so far returns only one IP address in the resource data. Multivalue answer records, as the name suggests, return multiple IP addresses in a single answer. By returning multiple IP addresses in a single answer, the client can decide which of those IP addresses to use. Generally the client will choose the first IP address in the list, but it's free to use the other addresses as well, for example, if the client can't connect to the first IP address in the list, it can try the second, and so on. Something we have not done, though it is possible, is create a simple resource record with multiple IP addresses. This also results in a client getting back multiple IP addresses in a single answer and thus being able to choose among those addresses. However, the advantage of multivalue answer records is that you can use health checks with them. This means if an endpoint fails its health check, Route 53 will remove its IP address from the answer that it returns to the client.